News & Events

Two young boys stand near a field of corn, one with a bicycle
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Blog
September 25, 2014 | USDA Blog
Long-term global food security depends on us acting together now.
News
September 30, 2014 | Newsletter
Insight into this variability is critical to helping people adapt their livelihoods – for example, when and where to plant crops – and empowering governments to make climate-smart decisions on agricultural investments, resource management, disaster preparedness and other policies.
Field Story
September 30, 2014 | Newsletter
With new short duration rice seeds, however, Rahman was able to grow rice in a shorter amount of time, leaving him less vulnerable to frequent overflows from the local river. He tripled the amount of rice he could harvest in a calendar year by using varieties that mature in about 90 days.
Blog
September 30, 2014 | Newsletter
In concert with the U.S. Global Climate Change Initiative, Feed the Future is partnering to meet the challenge of increasing global food production by at least 60 percent by 2050 to feed a growing population while sustainably managing natural resources and adapting to a changing climate.
Blog
September 30, 2014 | Newsletter
From wheat farming to water management, the U.S. Government is supporting climate smart agriculture and the sustainable use of natural resources in the Central Asian Republics to help ensure that farmers will be able to feed their families for a long time to come.
News
September 30, 2014 | Newsletter
Agriculture is the cornerstone of rural livelihoods in the developing world, and irrigated agriculture contributes to rural economic growth and food security through more reliable water supplies in the face of low and unevenly distributed rainfall.
Field Story
September 30, 2014 | Newsletter
Crop diversification encourages farmers to plant a number of crops including different varieties of rice and vegetables on the same plot throughout the year, reducing the risk that a particularly long, hot dry season will threaten their food security or incomes.
News
September 30, 2014 | Newsletter
The good news is that some corn breeding lines are naturally resistant to A. flavus, and Feed the Future has the scientific tools to leverage this genetic advantage in the fight against aflatoxin. Researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and their collaborators are working to move protective corn genes for A. flavus resistance from naturally resistant breeding lines into new commercial corn varieties.