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Ghana

Agricultural growth is a major driver of poverty reduction in Ghana. Agriculture is the largest source of employment for Ghanaians and accounts for 41 percent of employment. Feed the Future’s efforts focus in Northern Ghana, where poverty is deeply entrenched and farming is dominated by smallholder farmers producing food and cash crops.

  • 220 THOUSAND
    Producers using new technologies and practices with Feed the Future’s help in FY17
  • $47 MILLION
    Annual agricultural sales generated by Ghanaians reached by Feed the Future in FY17 
  • 1.2 MILLION
    Children under 5 reached with nutrition help in FY17
  • $5.6 MILLION
    New private investment leveraged by Feed the Future in FY17

Impact

  • 12 PERCENT
    Reduction in the prevalence of poverty in the areas where Feed the Future has worked between 2012 and 2015
  • 17 PERCENT
    Reduction in the prevalence of stunting in children under 5 years old in the areas where Feed the Future has worked between 2012 and 2015

Key Achievements

Following the prioritization of Northern Ghana by the Feed the Future, the region saw an influx of development assistance from many development partners and the Government of Ghana to catalyze growth. Despite a continuing divide in standards of living between the North and South regions, Feed the Future has made sustainable reductions in poverty and stunting in Northern Ghana since 2010. Since 2012, there has been a 12 percent decrease in poverty and a 17 percent decrease in stunting in areas where Feed the Future works.

To improve productivity, Feed the Future partnered with private seed producers, input dealers, and extension service providers to enable 220,000 farmers to use improved seeds, fertilizers, and apply improved farming practices. Feed the Future partnered with private seed producers to more than double the production of maize and rice seed from 830 tons in 2015 to 1,800 tons in 2017. These efforts are  yielding results for farmers: In 2017, Feed the Future maize farmers’ average yields were 3.3 tons per hectare, well above the national average for the year.

Feed the Future’s efforts are also improving nutrition outcomes among women and children. In 2017, 86,000 women engaged in the production of nutrition-sensitive crops and in exclusive breastfeeding and preparation of nutritious food for children, participated in Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs), and invested in communal sanitation facilities.

Feed the Future worked with district governments to expand improved services such as sanitation and social protection, especially among remote communities. More than 165,000 people gained access to basic drinking water and sanitation.

Source

These results reflect information from the U.S. Agency for International Development, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Peace Corps reported into Feed the Future’s central monitoring system for fiscal year 2017 (FY17). The interim estimates of poverty and stunting are derived from the Ghana 2015 Zone of Influence Interim Indicator Assessment. For more information on the indicators above, please view our Feed the Future Indicator Handbook. All dollar amounts are listed in U.S. dollars.

Strategy

  • Improve the competitiveness of targeted value chains
  • Drive private sector investment in agriculture
  • Improve management of marine fisheries
  • Build the resilience of vulnerable populations
  • Boost nutrition, particularly among women and children
  • Increase incomes for smallholder farmers
  • Empower women and youth
  • Increase regional and international agricultural trade
  • Improve country leadership and commitment to increase food security
  • Increase Ghana’s self-reliance

Zones of Influence in Ghana

Map of Ghana
  • Northern, Upper West and Upper East Regions
  • Marine fisheries in six districts of the Western Region
  • Other areas of Ghana that support beneficiaries in targeted regions

Background Stats

  • 5.6 MILLION
    Number of people living in Feed the Future target regions (2015 Population Based Survey)
  • 8.6 PERCENT
    Annual GDP growth; agriculture accounts for 17% of added value (World Bank, 2017)
  • 45 PERCENT
    Percentage of population living in rural Ghana (World Bank, 2017)
  • 19.6 PERCENT
    Percentage of people living in poverty in Feed the Future target regions in 2015

Value Chains

  • Maize/Corn
  • Soybean
  • Cowpea
  • Peanut
  • Marine Fisheries
  • High value fruits and vegetables
Samuel Mahamadu shows off maize he grew on his farm in Ghana.

Approach

Agricultural growth is a major driver of poverty reduction in Ghana, especially in the southern part of the country. Agriculture is the largest source of employment for Ghanaians and accounts for 41 percent of employment. Feed the Future’s efforts focus in Northern Ghana, where poverty is deeply entrenched and farming is dominated by smallholder farmers producing food and cash crops. Ghana’s inflation has been averaging above 17 percent since 1998, resulting in high bank lending rates above 35 percent.

These challenging economic conditions, coupled with power outages across the country, have stifled growth and investment. However, even against this challenging backdrop, Feed the Future has seen significant gains by investing in the country’s agriculture sector.

To maximize impact in Ghana, Feed the Future efforts will focus on engaging the private sector, improving markets, targeting lucrative value chains with potential for sustained economic growth, integrating nutrition into agriculture programming, and partnering with Ghanaians to start moving beyond foreign aid. This approach will improve agricultural-led growth, resilience, and nutrition especially in poorer, dryer northern Ghana and support protection of marine fisheries in the coastal areas. Additionally, Feed the Future will target a reduced number of Zones of Influence, accelerate trade by making targeted investments in higher-value commercial crops across Ghana to support agricultural sector transformation and advance Ghana on its journey to self-reliance.

Activities

Feed the Future supports the following programs, partnerships and organizations in Ghana.

 

  • Africa Agriculture Technology Foundation (AATF)
  • Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation (Africa RISING)
  • African Women in Agricultural Research for Development (AWARD)
  • Agricultural Development and Value Chain Enhancement Program (ADVANCE)
  • Borlaug Higher Education Agricultural Research and Development Program (BHEARD)
  • Business Sector Advocacy Challenge Fund (BUSAC)
  • Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa (DTMA)
  • Empowering Agriculture Global Development Alliances (Integrated Water for Agriculture, Sahel Grains Limited)
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Assets and Market Access
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Climate-Resilient Cowpea
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Genomics to Improve Poultry
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for the Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Small-Scale Irrigation
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Soybean Value Chain Research
  • Ghana Strategy Support Program (GSSP)
  • Ghana Supply Chain Development (SCD) Program
  • The John Ogonowski and Doug Bereuter Farmer-to-Farmer Program
  • Norman E. Borlaug Leadership Enhancement in Agriculture Program (Borlaug LEAP)
  • Peace Corps Global Food Security Response Project
  • Program for Biosafety Systems
  • Resilience in Northern Ghana (RING)
  • USDA Monitoring and Evaluation Technical Support Services
  • Sustainable Fisheries Management Project (SFMP)
  • Savannah Agricultural Research Institute (SARI)
  • Technical and Financial Support to the University of Cape Coast
  • Technical and Financial Support to the University of Ghana
  • USAID Development Credit Authority Loan Portfolio Guarantee (DCA)
  • USDA’s Food for Progress Program

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