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Ghana

Agricultural growth is a major driver of poverty reduction in Ghana, especially in the southern part of the country. Agriculture is the largest source of employment for Ghanaians, with some progress being made in the north of Ghana, where poverty is deeply entrenched and farming is dominated by smallholder farmers producing food and cash crops.

  • 156 THOUSAND
    Producers using new technologies and practices with Feed the Future’s help in FY16
  • $40 MILLION
    New income earned by Feed the Future farmers in FY16 from agricultural sales
  • 900 THOUSAND
    Children under 5 reached with nutrition help in FY16
  • $16 MILLION
    New private investment leveraged by Feed the Future in FY16

Impact

  • 12 PERCENT
    Reduction in the prevalence of poverty in the areas where Feed the Future has worked since 2012
  • 18 PERCENT
    Reduction in the prevalence of stunting in children under 5 years old in the areas where Feed the Future has worked since 2012

Key Achievements

By using new technologies, labor saving practices, and better post-harvest handling, Feed the Future-supported Ghanaian farmers achieved important gains in 2016: 23,402 maize farmers increased their sales by $6.7 million, 5,209 rice farmers by $4.4 million, and 16,083 soybean farmers by $1.7 million, compared to what they were earning in 2012.

Feed the Future introduced new technologies like urea deep placement, direct paddy seeders, and alternate wetting and drying to 5,209 rice producers through field demonstrations. The overwhelming majority applied these new technologies on their land, and yields reached an average of 4.3 tons per hectare in 2016 – a 60 percent increase from 2013.

The U.S. Government and its partners, including the 17 districts participating in the Resiliency in Northern Ghana project, reached a total of 900,000 children under 5 with nutrition programs such as growth monitoring and promotion and food demonstrations of soy or cowpeas and iodized salt supplementation. These efforts also provided 603 health facilities with nutrition supplies to address acute malnutrition in 2016.

Source

These results reflect information from the U.S. Agency for International Development, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Peace Corps, and U.S. Department of the Treasury (through the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program) reported into Feed the Future’s central monitoring system for fiscal year 2016 (FY16). The interim estimates of poverty and stunting are derived from the Ghana 2015 Zone of Influence Interim Indicator Assessment (forthcoming). For more information on the indicators above, please view our Feed the Future Indicator Handbook. All dollar amounts are listed in U.S. dollars.

Strategy

  • Improve the competitiveness of targeted value chains
  • Improve management of marine fisheries
  • Improve the resilience of vulnerable populations
  • Improve nutrition, particularly of women and children
  • Increase maize, rice and soybean production in Northern Ghana
  • More than double gross margins per hectare of land for smallholder farmers

Zones of Influence in Ghana

Map of Ghana
  • Northern, Upper West and Upper East Regions
  • Northern Brong Ahafo
  • Marine fisheries in six districts of the Western Region
  • Other areas of Ghana that support beneficiaries in targeted regions

Background Stats

  • 5.2 MILLION
    Number of people living in Feed the Future target regions (2012)
  • 3.6 PERCENT
    Annual GDP growth; agriculture accounts for 20% of added value (World Bank, 2016)
  • 45 PERCENT
    Percentage of population living in rural Ghana (World Bank, 2016)
  • 19.6 PERCENT
    Percentage of people living in poverty in Feed the Future target regions in 2015

Value Chains

  • Rice
  • Maize
  • Soybean
  • Marine Fisheries
Samuel Mahamadu shows off maize he grew on his farm in Ghana.

Approach

Agricultural growth is a major driver of poverty reduction in Ghana, especially in the southern part of the country. Agriculture is the largest source of employment for Ghanaians, with some progress being made in the north of Ghana, where poverty is deeply entrenched and farming is dominated by smallholder farmers producing food and cash crops. Ghana has been in fiscal crisis with inflation averaging above 17 percent since 1998 – resulting in high bank lending rates above 35 percent and a declining gross domestic product. These challenging economic conditions, coupled with power outages across the country, have stifled growth and investment.

However, even against this challenging backdrop, Feed the Future has seen significant gains by investing in the country’s agriculture sector. Agriculture is the largest source of employment for Ghanaians. Agricultural growth is a major driver of poverty reduction in Ghana, especially in the southern part of the country. Some progress is being made in the north of Ghana, too, where poverty is deeply entrenched and farming is dominated by smallholder farmers producing food and cash crops.

In areas where Feed the Future works, poverty and stunting have reduced and farmers’ productivity and income have grown since 2012. Ghana has achieved an overall reduction in the poverty rate from 52 percent to 28 percent over the past 10 years. While Ghana has exhibited significant progress in agriculture, it must still import 60 percent of the rice and 15 percent of the maize consumed in-country. The demand for both these staple crops is predicted to escalate with the rise in incomes and a high urban growth rate. Thus, Ghana’s marine fisheries are also essential to food security, livelihoods and economic development, both within Ghana and the wider region. Marine fisheries are currently over-exploited due to a lack of investment in management and weak institutions that govern natural resources.

While Ghana has made progress in decreasing the prevalence of underweight children under 5, from 25 percent in 1998 to 11 percent in 2014, major child health challenges remain. The northern regions have greater rates of stunting, underweight and wasting, which are linked closely to food insecurity. Chronic undernutrition in these regions is linked to household poverty levels, disease burden, inadequate sanitation facilities and poor infant-feeding practices. Feed the Future is working with the Government of Ghana and other partners to improve economic opportunities and diversify household income in the rural northern area as well as to improve sustainable management of marine fisheries in coastal areas.

Activities

Feed the Future supports the following programs, partnerships and organizations in Ghana.

  • Africa Agriculture Technology Foundation (AATF)
  • Africa Lead
  • Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation (Africa RISING)
  • African Women in Agricultural Research for Development (AWARD)
  • Agricultural Development and Value Chain Enhancement Program (ADVANCE)
  • Agriculture Policy Support Project (APSP)
  • Agricultural Technology Transfer (ATT)
  • Agriculture and Natural Resource Management Project (AgNRM)
  • Borlaug Higher Education Agricultural Research and Development Program (BHEARD)
  • Business Sector Advocacy Challenge Fund (BUSAC)
  • Coastal Sustainable Landscapes Project (CSLP)
  • Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa (DTMA)
  • Empowering Agriculture Global Development Alliances (Fidelity Bank, Integrated Water for Agriculture, Sahel Grains
    Limited)
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Aquaculture and Fisheries
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Assets and Market Access
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Climate-Resilient Cowpea
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Genomics to Improve Poultry
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Grain Legumes
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Productivity and Mycotoxin Control
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for the Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Small-Scale Irrigation
  • Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Soybean Value Chain Research
  • Financing Ghana Agriculture Project (FinGAP)
  • Ghana Strategy Support Program (GSSP)
  • Ghana Supply Chain Development (SCD) Program
  • Monitoring, Evaluation and Technical Support Services (METSS)
  • New Alliance ICT Extension Challenge Fund in Ghana
  • Norman E. Borlaug Leadership Enhancement in Agriculture Program (Borlaug LEAP)
  • Program for Biosafety Systems
  • Resilience in Northern Ghana (RING)
  • USDA Monitoring and Evaluation Technical Support Services
  • Scaling Seeds and Technology Partnership (Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa)
  • Sustainable Fisheries Management Project (SFMP)
  • The John Ogonowski and Doug Bereuter Farmer-to-Farmer Program
  • USAID Development Credit Authority Loan Portfolio Guarantee (DCA)
  • Vegetable Post Harvest Handling Project
  • Savannah Agricultural Research Institute (SARI)
  • Agriculture and Agribusiness Desk, Ministry of Finance
  • Technical and Financial Support to the University of Ghana
  • USDA’s Food for Progress Program

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